Insights Completion

October 10, 2016

To date, my insights of primary and secondary research.

 

LOSS OF ARTIFACTS: 

“Some 30,000 children are moving through the system [in Texas alone], it is inevitable that personal items are going to be misplaced.”

 

OVERWHELMING AGENDA: 

“Responsibilities of a foster parent include but are not limited to: keeping accurate records on the child including medical, dental, mental health, education, monthly progress notes/reports, life book, visitation, and any written material necessary to case planning; as well as transporting and accompanying the child to all health, dental, mental health appointments, school meetings and supporting the visitation plan as determined by the court/agency...”

 

LIMITED RESOURCES: 

“Most states reimburse foster parents significantly less than the actual cost of raising a foster child; to adequately cover the cost of rearing a foster child, base payments in 28 states would need to be raised at least 50 percent.”

 

LACK OF SPACE: 

“When you have the lack of stability in your life, the lack of control you have in foster care, you would hope these kids would be able to hang onto some of these other things.”

 

INDIFFERENT FOSTER PARENTS: 

“The flow of money to private foster care — now about $400 million a year — introduced a powerful incentive for some to spend as little as possible [on the kids’ welfare] and pack homes with as many children as they could.”

 

INEFFECTIVE PRODUCTS: 

“Lifebooks™ are a growing trend around the country, because too many children age out of care without knowing their life’s history. These enable children to connect with their past and actually help them deal with the trauma they have faced in their young lives.

 

WHERE MEMORIES ARE CREATED: 

Although children spent 30% of their week at school, most memories are created elsewhere, surrounded by family and friends.

 

EFFECT OF MEMORIES: 

Studies have shown the positive effect of memories. Feeling important is crucial to the development of a successful individual.

 

TANGIBLE OBJECTS: 

Despite the advances in technology and product availability, many children still appreciate an item because of the longevity of it in one’s life.

 

SIGNIFICANT EVENTS: 

Most memories occur at significant points in the child’s life, whether occasions or life-changing events.

 

THE GOOD TIMES: 

Children say that they remember the good times when things are not going so well; a form of self-coping.

 

LESSON LEARNED: 

Their memories have taught them valuable lessons, such as obedience, forgiveness, and gratefulness.

 

GRATEFUL:

Memories provide a sense of appreciation of what has been given and lost as well.

 

THE BAD TIMES:

Remembering can trigger negative feelings, especially the lack of memories.

 

SAFETY HAZARD:

Cyber criminals often target children so screen time must to be monitored.

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